1201 N Lakeline Blvd, Suite 400, Cedar Park, TX 78613            512.379.7272            Zest Family Medicine                     Open Monday to Friday, 9 am to 7 pm

810 Hospital Drive, Suite 100, Beaumont, TX 77701                  409.338.5610           Broussard Family Medicine          Open Mon 9-4, Tues 9-7, Wed 9-4, Thurs 9-4, Fri 9-12

scarring help, prevent scars, cure for scar, eliminate scar in Cedar Park and Beaumont

The Causes and Cures for Scars

Skin is a seamless organ, like a fine cloth protecting valuable assets. Imagine a piece of silk. Just one small tear can make a big difference in how it looks. And it’s the same with skin. Any burn, injury, or other trauma, such as surgery, can cause a scar.
Now a scar isn’t bad if it’s small or in a location that’s easy to conceal. But when it’s not, you may wonder if there’s a way to treat it, other than hiding it.
The truth is the scar will never completely go away. But there are some methods that can help reduce its size and change its appearance.

How Does Scarring Happen?
Scarring is a natural part of the healing process after an injury. Its appearance and its treatment depend on multiple factors.
The depth and size of the wound or cut and the location of the injury matter. So do your age, genes, sex, and ethnicity.

What Are The Types of Scars?
There are several different types of scars including:
■ Keloid scars. These scars are the result of an overly aggressive healing process. They extend beyond the original injury. Over time, a keloid scar may hamper movement. Treatments include surgery to remove the scar, steroid injections, or silicone sheets to flatten the scar. Smaller keloids can be treated using cryotherapy (freezing therapy using liquid nitrogen). Keloid scars are most common among people with  dark skin.
■  Contracture scars. If your skin has been burned, you may have a contracture scar. These scars tighten skin, which can impair your ability to move. Contracture scars may also go deeper, affecting muscles and nerves.
■ Hypertrophic scars. These are raised, red scars that are similar to keloids but do not go beyond the boundary of the injury. Treatments include injections of steroids to reduce inflammation or silicone sheets, which flatten the scar.
■ Acne scars. If you’ve had severe acne, you probably have the scars to prove it. There are many types of acne scars, ranging from deep pits to scars that are angular or wavelike in appearance. Treatment options depend on the types of acne scars you have.

Treatments for Scars?
Scar treatments may include:
■  Over-the-counter or prescription creams, ointments, or gels.  
■  Surgical removal or treatment. There are many options to treat deeper scars depending on your particular case. These include skin grafts, excision, microdermabrasion, pcit or laser treatments.
 ■  Injections. You may get steroid injections to treat scars that stick out, such as keloids or hypertrophic scars. Your medical provider may use this on its own or with other treatments. Other types of injections, such as collagen or other “fillers,” may be useful for some types of pitted scarring, although these are not usually permanent solutions.

What Makes Scars Worse?
■ Sun: Exposing scars to the sun can cause them to darken and slow the healing process. Your safest bet: Before heading outdoors, slather on a broad-spectrum sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher.
■ Picking and Squeezing: Scars, which are made mainly of collagen, are the body’s way of repairing itself. Acne scars are typically indented because of collagen loss from intense inflammation. Picking leads to further inflammation and injury of the skin, which adds to the skin’s discoloration and scarring.
■ Vitamin E: You may have heard that applying topical vitamin E to a scar will help it heal faster. But according to a study from researchers at the University of Miami, applying the nutrient directly onto a scar can actually hinder its healing.


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